Disney+’s New Marvel Series Leans into Silliness, for Better and Worse

Disney+’s She-Hulk: Attorney at Law is a very, very silly show.

Don’t get me wrong. She-Hulk: Attorney at Law is exactly the sort of silly show you should be expecting from a series called She-Hulk: Attorney at Law. It’s broad, bright and eager to serve the audience with a wink and a nudge. It’s loose to the point of near formlessness, boasting a clear theme and a savvy feminist streak, but it doesn’t seem to even be aspiring to stakes or a distinctive style.

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Based on the four half-hour episodes sent to critics, She-Hulk is more Ally McBeal than The Good Fightas legally focused comedies go, closer to the sort of relentlessly meta tweaking of classic sitcom tropes characteristic of the early episodes of WandaVision than the darker, richer undercurrents characteristic of the later episodes. Approached on its own terms, She-Hulk: Attorney at Law is zippy, amusing and laden with Easter eggs, but anybody looking for “more” — more darkness, more drama, more cohesion — will be frustrated.

That frustration could come almost immediately, because Jessica Gao’s pilot, working with a character created by Stan Lee and John Buscema and expanded in various comic book iterations with varying amounts of levity and fourth wall breaking, begins with a fake-out. Deputy district attorney Jennifer Walters (Tatiana Maslany) is about to head into a completely irrelevant trial, and her paralegal/best friend Nikki (Ginger Gonzaga) suggests that if all else fails in court, she can just hulk out. The idea of ​​a show like this starting without a perfunctory origin story feels refreshing for maybe two seconds, until Jen turns to the camera and says, “It’s true. I am a Hulk,” launching into exactly that perfunctory origin story, which takes up nearly the

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Disney+’s New Marvel Series Leans into Silliness, for Better and Worse

Disney+’s She-Hulk: Attorney at Law is a very, very silly show.

Don’t get me wrong. She-Hulk: Attorney at Law is exactly the sort of silly show you should be expecting from a series called She-Hulk: Attorney at Law. It’s broad, bright and eager to serve the audience with a wink and a nudge. It’s loose to the point of near formlessness, boasting a clear theme and a savvy feminist streak, but it doesn’t seem to even be aspiring to stakes or a distinctive style.

More from The Hollywood Reporter

Based on the four half-hour episodes sent to critics, She-Hulk is more Ally McBeal than The Good Fightas legally focused comedies go, closer to the sort of relentlessly meta tweaking of classic sitcom tropes characteristic of the early episodes of WandaVision than the darker, richer undercurrents characteristic of the later episodes. Approached on its own terms, She-Hulk: Attorney at Law is zippy, amusing and laden with Easter eggs, but anybody looking for “more” — more darkness, more drama, more cohesion — will be frustrated.

That frustration could come almost immediately, because Jessica Gao’s pilot, working with a character created by Stan Lee and John Buscema and expanded in various comic book iterations with varying amounts of levity and fourth wall breaking, begins with a fake-out. Deputy district attorney Jennifer Walters (Tatiana Maslany) is about to head into a completely irrelevant trial, and her paralegal/best friend Nikki (Ginger Gonzaga) suggests that if all else fails in court, she can just hulk out. The idea of ​​a show like this starting without a perfunctory origin story feels refreshing for maybe two seconds, until Jen turns to the camera and says, “It’s true. I am a Hulk,” launching into exactly that perfunctory origin story, which takes up nearly the

Read the rest Continue Reading